The Deplorables

They're The DeplorablesHillary Clinton, while speaking a select group of wealthy queers in New York City last Friday, said that fully 50% of Donald Trump’s supporters were racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, and/or islamaphobic. She bluntly and openly described them – a very conservatively estimated 22 million American voters – as a basket of deplorables i.e. as deserving of strong condemnation due to shock, fear, or disgust they engender.

Rather than choose to be offended by Hillary’s declaration, I decided to think about what she said objectively and to take into account the greater context of Hillary’s words, audience, and cultural history. Doing so has allowed me to realize that this is just another case where the Left confuses facts and truth.

The simple and sad fact is that, within the context of how Liberals, Progressives, and those who they enable and pander to have mis-defined various form of bigotry and expanded what they consider examples thereof, we are racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, and/or islamaphobic. Indeed, given their beliefs, it’s not just 50% of Donald Trump’s supporters who are so deplorable; it’s entirety of the White population of America who is so …or at least so their oikophobic ideology forces them to believe. Their only internal conflict is when an individual with one “protected trait” is perceived by them to have attacked another with a different “protected trait.” Then, suffer from hysterical paralysis until they can determine the hierarchy of victimology.

So what is truly deplorable and abhorrent to Americans is not what Hillary said. It is what her followers truly believe and that is deplorable indeed.

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How to Think Seriously About the Planet: The Case for an Environmental Conservatism
America's Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America
It's Not Over: Getting Beyond Tolerance, Defeating Homophobia, and Winning True Equality
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#BlackNipplesMatter

So today, being the Sunday closest to closest to Women’s Equality Day, Aug 26, is Go Topless Day. Today, women will be encouraged to go topless in public and, in many cities – I Love NYC – there will be parades and such.

In other words, once again the Feminists refuse to acknowledge, much less check, their White Privilege and engage in mass public displays that showcase their racial and cultural insensitivities – and lack of historical knowledge. Once again the Feminists reinforce the fact that feminism is a White Thing and that the different views, histories, and experiences of Black women are meaningless to them and their narrative.

So what we need is a “counter movement” like #BlackNipplesMatter or maybe #FreeTheBlackNipple so that Black women can so visibly campaign for their own reasons for being topless in public.

#BlackNipplesMatter

Truly, things like #GoTopless and #FreeTheNipple are the same as #AllLivesMatter. They further marginalize the plight of Black women by ignoring the different and great oppression they suffer from having to cover their breasts.

The Why Of #BlackNipplesMatter

Firstly: Feminism has from its sociopolitical inception been a White phenomenon and has always been firmly rooted in racism. This is largely due to the disparate goals and experiences of White and Black women but is never the less a historical fact. Hence, any fruit from the poisonous tree of Feminism is tainted by that history.

Secondly: The choice of the closest Sunday to Women’s Equality Day for Go Topless Day is stunningly racially insensitive. Women’s Equality Day commemorates the 1920 certification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the privilege to vote. Yet that didn’t in practice allow Black women that privilege. It was the 1960s before Black woman were effectively enfranchised in any number. Nor is there any evidence that the Feminists of those days were in any number particularly bothered by this state of affairs.

Thirdly, Finally, and Most Importantly: Go Topless Day is solely based upon the idea of gender equality and that ignores the fact that Black women may not approach this topic on those very limited terms. For Black women, women whose pre-Diaspora cultures did not include the covering of women’s breasts as the norm, forcing them to do so is just another case of cultural genocide against Blacks. Ignoring that is just yet another example of Feminists silencing the voices and stories of Black women by saying that only White reasons matter.

~*~

jonolanAnd yes, in the sadly likely event that some of you don’t get it, this was sarcasm and dark humor. I was primarily lampooning and ridiculing the idiots of the #GoTopless and #FreeTheNipple movements who are complaining about not being allowed to go topless when it is only illegal for them to do so in 3 states, and unlegislated either way in 13 others, and expressly legal in 34.

And yet, the thing is that none of the arguments I made in sarcasm against #GoTopless and #FreeTheNipple or in favor of something like #BlackNipplesMatter or #FreeTheBlackNipple aren’t exactly the sort of arguments that “Afrocentric” SJWs wouldn’t feel perfectly justified to make in all sincerity.

And therein is the problem with being sarchotic. 😯

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Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir

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27 Real Hard Questions

Here’s 27 real hard questions by Blacks for Blacks – 27 questions that could, if honestly answered, be the basis of an extended “teachable moment” about the “Black Community” and the pathology of Blackness in America. In other words, here’s the basis for Holder’s “frank discussions about race.”

  1. Why is it so hard to be on time?
  2. If my dab is on fleek, am I lit?
  3. Why is it a problem if I like anime?
  4. Why do Black people look at your shoes before they greet you?
  5. Why are we more likely to engage in the new dance trend than we are to get involved in politics or opening a business?
  6. How did watermelon become our thing?
  7. Why do you get upset when I don’t like a Black celebrity?
  8. Why do we call each other the N-word but get vehemently upset when a White person uses the N-word?
  9. Why is my natural hair seen as a political statement?
  10. Why do we think people with light skin look better than people with dark skin?
  11. Do you really believe that Black is beautiful? Or is that something you say ’cause it sounds cool?
  12. Why do some Black people say that you’re pretty “for a dark-skinned girl”?
  13. Why do some Black men only date White women?
  14. Why is it okay for Black men to date White women but not okay for a Black woman to date outside her race?
  15. Why do you protest Black Lives Matter – and then tear each other down in the next breath?
  16. Why do we say that we don’t want to be seen as a monolith, but then try to take people’s Black Cards away for not liking something that’s “supposedly” Black?
  17. Why are we so quick to support a non-Black-owned business but then hesitate when it’s a Black-owned business?
  18. Is there a cut-off time for this whole homophobia thing in the Black community?
  19. Why is growing up without a father so common in our race?
  20. Why don’t we like to confront our mental health issues?
  21. Why is there a checklist for being Black?
  22. Why is being educated considered a “White” thing? Why can’t I love school and also be Black?
  23. Why do I have to be mixed in order to have long hair?
  24. Why do you think well-off Black people don’t know what it means to be Black?
  25. Why do some Black people say, “Oh, I have Native American in my family,” in order to feel interesting or more valuable than other Black people around them?
  26. Why can’t we just acknowledge that there are a bunch of different types of Black people walking around and they’re all amazing and unique and special in their own way?
  27. Why are we always looking for the discount?

OK, in my opinion only 25 of those 27 questions are worthy of an answer other than an eye roll or a slap to face because questions because questions 2 and 27 are beyond stupid. But that still leaves 25 real and probably hard questions for the “Black Community” to answer.

Not, of course, that we’d ever get an answer to these questions out of the Blacks. Hell! The Blacks at Buzzfeed who first asked these questions of other Blacks couldn’t even get much in the way of answers beyond, “Institutional RACISM!!!!” amid a long stream of deflections, tired and trite insults, and the occasional expected threat.

Related Reading:

A Is for America: A Patriotic Alphabet Book
Sassy Sayings, Snarky Sarcasms, & Saucy Swears: A Coloring Book for Adults
Lead Heart (Seraph Black Book 3)
Racism
Faggots

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