27 Real Hard Questions

Here’s 27 real hard questions by Blacks for Blacks – 27 questions that could, if honestly answered, be the basis of an extended “teachable moment” about the “Black Community” and the pathology of Blackness in America. In other words, here’s the basis for Holder’s “frank discussions about race.”

  1. Why is it so hard to be on time?
  2. If my dab is on fleek, am I lit?
  3. Why is it a problem if I like anime?
  4. Why do Black people look at your shoes before they greet you?
  5. Why are we more likely to engage in the new dance trend than we are to get involved in politics or opening a business?
  6. How did watermelon become our thing?
  7. Why do you get upset when I don’t like a Black celebrity?
  8. Why do we call each other the N-word but get vehemently upset when a White person uses the N-word?
  9. Why is my natural hair seen as a political statement?
  10. Why do we think people with light skin look better than people with dark skin?
  11. Do you really believe that Black is beautiful? Or is that something you say ’cause it sounds cool?
  12. Why do some Black people say that you’re pretty “for a dark-skinned girl”?
  13. Why do some Black men only date White women?
  14. Why is it okay for Black men to date White women but not okay for a Black woman to date outside her race?
  15. Why do you protest Black Lives Matter – and then tear each other down in the next breath?
  16. Why do we say that we don’t want to be seen as a monolith, but then try to take people’s Black Cards away for not liking something that’s “supposedly” Black?
  17. Why are we so quick to support a non-Black-owned business but then hesitate when it’s a Black-owned business?
  18. Is there a cut-off time for this whole homophobia thing in the Black community?
  19. Why is growing up without a father so common in our race?
  20. Why don’t we like to confront our mental health issues?
  21. Why is there a checklist for being Black?
  22. Why is being educated considered a “White” thing? Why can’t I love school and also be Black?
  23. Why do I have to be mixed in order to have long hair?
  24. Why do you think well-off Black people don’t know what it means to be Black?
  25. Why do some Black people say, “Oh, I have Native American in my family,” in order to feel interesting or more valuable than other Black people around them?
  26. Why can’t we just acknowledge that there are a bunch of different types of Black people walking around and they’re all amazing and unique and special in their own way?
  27. Why are we always looking for the discount?

OK, in my opinion only 25 of those 27 questions are worthy of an answer other than an eye roll or a slap to face because questions because questions 2 and 27 are beyond stupid. But that still leaves 25 real and probably hard questions for the “Black Community” to answer.

Not, of course, that we’d ever get an answer to these questions out of the Blacks. Hell! The Blacks at Buzzfeed who first asked these questions of other Blacks couldn’t even get much in the way of answers beyond, “Institutional RACISM!!!!” amid a long stream of deflections, tired and trite insults, and the occasional expected threat.

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An Unsafe Opinion

Bryan StascavageLast month Bryan Stascavage, a 30-year-old Wesleyan University (WSA) economics major and decorated veteran who served two tours as an military intelligence analyst for the US Army in Iraq penned an unsafe opinion about the Black Live Matter (#BlackLivesMatter) movement in an op-ed for his the school newspaper, The Wesleyan Argus. The previous winner of WSA’s Chadbourne Prize was shocked by the result.

His op-ed, “Why Black Lives Matter Isn’t What You Think,” wasn’t a glowing endorsement of the Blacks’ movement and, therefor, was met with a shitstorm of hate and vitriol from the Blacks and the Liberals and Progressives who pander to- and enable them.

That was, in itself, completely to be expected and it’s hard to generate any true sympathy for Mr. Stascavage who should have known what he was buying for himself by not adhering to the Left’s and their minority sharecroppers’ orthodox dogma of total submission to their doctrine.

No. What is horrific is a subset of these vermin’s response, not against Mr. Stascavage directly, but against the The Wesleyan Argus which published his opinion piece and, thereby, exposed the student body to it. The Liberals, Progressives, and their minority sharecroppers are demanding that Wesleyan University defund the Argus because of it.

A petition demanding the Wesleyan Argus lose funding unless it meets certain demands has signatures from at least 172 students, staff and recent alumni. Signatories threatened to boycott the paper because they said it fails to “provide a safe space for the voices of students of color and we are doubtful that it will in the future.”

They also demand that commitment be made by the Argus to create work study/course credit positions; a monthly report on allocation of funds and leadership structure; a required once-per-semester Social Justice/Diversity training for all student publications; active recruitment and advertisement; and open space on the front page in the publication dedicated to marginalized groups/voices, specifying that if no submissions are received, The Argus will print a section labeled “for your voice.”

This is what now passes for students in these Affirmative Action times and in the wake of what the “Civil Rights” movement has degenerated into. They demand that White voices be silenced in favor of “Social Justice” and providing Liberal, Progressive, and Minority students total freedom from any opinion or subject matter that might may them uncomfortable in some way, shape, or form by not rigorously adhering to their sensitivities.

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Dance, Boy!

Nigger Needs To Dance
Dance, Boy!

Truly, telling Kanye West to dance is the only proper answer to the boy’s vileness and stupidity. The filthy buck should either be taught to dance the Sam Peckinpah or, my personal preference for its sort, the Danny Deever from a tree limb.

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