Archive for the 'Ethics & Morality' Category

What’s The Harm?

Posted in Ethics & Morality, Philosophy, Politics, Society on May 3rd, 2015

The role and extent of government has been a matter of contention since Man first developed government. Nowhere is this more true than the ongoing war over what, if any, harm any government should allow to happen to the People.

Even the philosopher Hugo Adam Bedau, a current favorite among limited government and social liberal circles doesn’t provide much surcease from the argument.

Government should allow persons to engage in whatever conduct they want to, no matter how deviant or abnormal it may be, so long as:

  1. they know what they are doing,
  2. they consent to it, and
  3. no one — at least no one other than the participants — is harmed by it.

— Hugo Adam Bedau

Sure, Bedau’s words sound good and is if they’d make a good framework for the limits of government involvement and interference with the lives and actions of the governed.  Sadly, however Bedau’s words beg the questions of what is the proof of knowledge aforethought and what constitutes consent.

His words also, much like the Wiccan Rede – An it harm none, do as you will – leave the glaring and easily warred over questions of what’s the harm and, much like claims of offensiveness,  just who gets to decide that harm has been done in the first place.

No, not even Bedau’s simple prescription will ameliorate the conflict over just what the government should be allowed to regulate or proscribe.

Related Reading:

Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar . . .: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes
Liberty!: How the Revolutionary War Began (Landmark Books)
By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission
Dr. Andrew Moulden: Every Vaccine Produces Harm
Emergence: Contemporary Readings in Philosophy and Science (Bradford Books)

The Parable Of The Lions

Posted in Ethics & Morality, Society on April 10th, 2015

When it comes to teaching, the importance of the parables can hardly be overestimated. Scholars, rhetoricians, politicians, and philosophers as long ago as Socrates Aristotle used the didactic approach of these succinct stories to teach and illustrate deeper truths and moral or spiritual lessons in a fascinating and intriguing manner that engaged the student.

In light of that, I present the Parable of The Lions:

The Lions

There was a pride of lions in the African Savannah that did very well. They were the envy of the plains. They did so well that often the other prides would get to feed on their leftovers. In fact, some actually lived on these remains. Their success was based on their great leadership. The Alpha pair would not tolerate laziness or cowardice from the others in the pride. After a while, the other lions’ envy grew and with it so grew their resentment. They said it was not fair that these few should have so much and meanwhile, they only shared in the scraps and their plight was always a struggle.

As their envy grew, so did their boldness. One day, with the help of other sympathetic beasts, they managed to kill the Alpha pair. They rejoiced in their deed. They now had achieved the equality they sought after for so long.

After a while, the laziness set in for some of the others in the top pride. Without the strong leadership of the Alpha pair, this laziness became more and more prevalent throughout the pride and their skills and abilities diminished.

“What!?” Said the others. “You are no longer leaving scraps for us to take. That’s not fair! We are also hungry!” So, the others began laying in wait for them to make the kill and then they would pounce on them, overcoming them in numbers and stealing their meat.

The more that this happened, the less that the top pride was willing to hunt. Some that still possessed the cunning and drive moved from the Savannah to another part of the country where again they flourished and built up the pride as it once was.

In the end, the Savannah lions, no longer able to get sustenance for themselves, turned on each other. Now they live a meager existence and share in their equality.

Michael M. Garcia

Yes, “The Lions” is a compelling parable that presents both some of the political woes besetting America and rest the Civilized World and the underlying societal and moral failures that have engendered those horrific and destructive political issues.

Related Reading:

HEROIKA 1: DRAGON EATERS
The Takers
The Parables: Understanding What Jesus Meant
The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers
The American Way: A Geographical History of Crisis and Recovery

Moral Turpitude

Posted in Ethics & Morality, Politics, Society on December 11th, 2014

Liberals and Progressives, especially those making their respective nuts by indoctrinating America’s youth in academia, love to rant about “Diversity.”

It's Called Moral Turpitude
It’s Called Moral Turpitude

Dr. Thomas Sowell, Ph.D, one of the rare men of both learning and wisdom, provides the American people with the nigh on perfect response to such dogmatic ravings by Leftist academics.

I will go one step further, however, and point out that this level of hypocrisy meets the definition of moral turpitude and in most colleges and universities such moral turpitude is solid ground for dismissal and even removal of tenure.

It will take long, hard, and frustrating work but we, the People can break the Liberal magisterium by breaking the teachers, professors, and school administrators that make it up.

Related Reading:

The Diversity and Inclusion Handbook
Thank You: (a book for teachers)
Beyond Hypocrisy: Decoding the News in an Age of Propaganda
Stuff Every College Student Should Know
Drumset Beats and Fills: For Today's Progressive Music