Archive for the 'Books & Reading' Category

The Dispossessed Majority

Posted in Books & Reading, Politics, Society on October 3rd, 2015

Wilmot Robertson’s The Dispossessed Majority is, to say the least, provocative reading on the subject of the state of- and collapse of America as a vital, moral, productive nation and culture. It recounts the tragedy of a great people, the Americans of European descent, who built The United States of America, and whose decline is the chief cause of America’s decline.

Part an elegy, part a galvanic recall to greatness, Robertson’s book hammers home the theme that America has changed for the worse because its founding and once dominant population group, the Majority, has been reduced to second-class status.

Please do note, however, that this is somewhat difficult reading. You’ll have to shift through some opinions that are quite flawed in my opinion, e.g., that the underlying cause of Black misbehavior is genetic and evolutionary in nature as opposed to being cultural exacerbated by some level of congenital malformation. Also, it’s couched in terms of the 1960’s and 1970’s, so some translation of the connotations of the words will be required to properly understand the author’s points.

Still, all in all it’s a worthy book and only political correctness – and the fact that Wilmot Robertson was right in saying that the Liberal-Minority consortium has turned White Americans into second-class citizens – is to blame for most not having heard of- or read it.

Related Reading:

White Trash Zombie Gone Wild: A White Trash Zombie Novel
The Interpretation Of Cultures (Basic Books Classics)
Malcolm X at Oxford Union: Racial Politics in a Global Era (Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities)
The Dispossessed Majority
Mobilizing New York: AIDS, Antipoverty, and Feminist Activism (Gender and American Culture)

Other Than Eldritch

Posted in Books & Reading, Politics, Society on February 23rd, 2015

When one thinks of H. P. Lovecraft, if one does think of him at all, one thinks naturally of his Cthulhu Mythos. That’s unsurprising since Lovecraft is heralded as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, writers of horror fiction of the twentieth century and the Cthulhu Mythos was the centerpiece of his writing. Lovecraft, however, wrote more than just horror. He also published a journal heavily focused on sociopolitical thought, The Conservative.

H. P. Lovecraft’s The Conservative had little no nothing to do with eldritch horrors. It was a journal edited and self-published sporadically by H. P. Lovecraft between 1915 and 1923. Some of its pieces were written by Lovecraft himself, but many of them were written by others. They included not just political and social commentary on the issues of the day, but also poetry, short stories and literary criticism.

The period in time covered by The Conservative coincided with some of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth century, including the First World War and the Russian Revolution.

It’s quite the interesting read.

Note, however, that I said it was an interesting read. It is not an easy one; not at all. It is firmly grounded in the society, issues, and history of a century ago. Still, I wholeheartedly recommend it as an addition to any American’s library.

Related Reading:

Brave Companions: Portraits In History
Cthulhu Fhtagn!
The Conscience of a Conservative
Society: The Basics (13th Edition)
The New Annotated H. P. Lovecraft (The Annotated Books)

Reared For Immortality

Posted in Books & Reading, Politics on January 27th, 2015


Joseph Story, who served on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1811 to 1845, is best known outside of legal circle for his magisterial treatise of US Constitution, Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States, which was first published in 1833 and, to this day, is considered one of seminal publications on the highest and most fundamental sets of American law and jurisprudence.

In all truth, Justice Story’s various writings but most especially his Commentaries, should be required reading in schools. Sadly however, I have never even heard about it being on an optional reading list.

Then this oversight might be explained by Story’s own words in Book II (2nd edition and later) of his Commentaries:

If these Commentaries shall but inspire in the rising generation a more ardent love of their country, an unquenchable thirst for liberty, and a profound reverence for the constitution and the union, then they will have accomplished all that their author ought to desire. Let the American youth never forget that they possess a noble inheritance, bought by the toils, and sufferings, and blood of their ancestors; and capable, if wisely improved, and faithfully guarded, of transmitting to their latest posterity all the substantial blessings of life, the peaceful enjoyment of liberty, property, religion, and independence. The structure has been erected by architects of consummate skill and fidelity; its foundations are solid; its compartments are beautiful as well as useful; its arrangements are full of wisdom and order; and its defenses are impregnable from without. It has been reared for immortality, if the work of man may justly aspire to such a title. It may, nevertheless, perish in an hour by the folly, or corruption, or negligence of its only keepers, THE PEOPLE. Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall, when the wise are banished from the public councils, because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded, because they flatter the people in order to betray them.

If the Commentaries accomplished all that their author ought to desire, America would never have reached a point when and where what passes for our educational system did not include the work in the curriculum. Now, our nation having reached the point when and where it is only the profligate who are rewarded, Justice Story’s work is antithetical to ideology that the school system wants to inculcate in the rising generation.

After all, since the 1960s the schools system has been more and more striving to teach the American youth to forget that they possess a noble inheritance, bought by the toils, and sufferings, and blood of their ancestors. Indeed, quite the opposite is taught now in what passes for our public schools.

And therein is meat of the problem. America’s domestic enemies know and capitalize upon the fact that America has been reared for immortality, but that it may perish in an hour by the folly, or corruption, or negligence of its only keepers, the People.

Related Reading:

The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way
America: A Narrative History (Brief Ninth Edition)  (Vol. 1)
The Constitution
Constitutional Law For Dummies
BLACK'S LAW DICTIONARY;10TH EDITION (Black's Law Dictionary (Standard Edition))