An Unsafe Opinion

Posted in Society on October 6th, 2015

Bryan StascavageLast month Bryan Stascavage, a 30-year-old Wesleyan University (WSA) economics major and decorated veteran who served two tours as an military intelligence analyst for the US Army in Iraq penned an unsafe opinion about the Black Live Matter (#BlackLivesMatter) movement in an op-ed for his the school newspaper, The Wesleyan Argus. The previous winner of WSA’s Chadbourne Prize was shocked by the result.

His op-ed, “Why Black Lives Matter Isn’t What You Think,” wasn’t a glowing endorsement of the Blacks’ movement and, therefor, was met with a shitstorm of hate and vitriol from the Blacks and the Liberals and Progressives who pander to- and enable them.

That was, in itself, completely to be expected and it’s hard to generate any true sympathy for Mr. Stascavage who should have known what he was buying for himself by not adhering to the Left’s and their minority sharecroppers’ orthodox dogma of total submission to their doctrine.

No. What is horrific is a subset of these vermin’s response, not against Mr. Stascavage directly, but against the The Wesleyan Argus which published his opinion piece and, thereby, exposed the student body to it. The Liberals, Progressives, and their minority sharecroppers are demanding that Wesleyan University defund the Argus because of it.

A petition demanding the Wesleyan Argus lose funding unless it meets certain demands has signatures from at least 172 students, staff and recent alumni. Signatories threatened to boycott the paper because they said it fails to “provide a safe space for the voices of students of color and we are doubtful that it will in the future.”

They also demand that commitment be made by the Argus to create work study/course credit positions; a monthly report on allocation of funds and leadership structure; a required once-per-semester Social Justice/Diversity training for all student publications; active recruitment and advertisement; and open space on the front page in the publication dedicated to marginalized groups/voices, specifying that if no submissions are received, The Argus will print a section labeled “for your voice.”

This is what now passes for students in these Affirmative Action times and in the wake of what the “Civil Rights” movement has degenerated into. They demand that White voices be silenced in favor of “Social Justice” and providing Liberal, Progressive, and Minority students total freedom from any opinion or subject matter that might may them uncomfortable in some way, shape, or form by not rigorously adhering to their sensitivities.

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Painted In Blood & Irony

Posted in Art, Society on October 3rd, 2015

During the morning of Tuesday, September 29, 2015 a street artist, identified by friends as Antonio Ramos, in Oakland, CA was gunned down and killed while working on a community art project, the Oakland Superheroes Mural Project which is a project sponsored by Oakland’s Attitudinal Healing Connection.

Straight Outta Oakland
Straight Outta Oakland – Painted In Blood & Irony

Yes, this is sad. Indeed, it approaches the level of tragedy. It should, however, have been an expected outcome. It’s not rational to believe that one can to empower individuals to be self-aware and inspired through arts, creativity and education, making positive choices to break the cycle of violence for themselves and their communities in the ghettos and barrios. Crime and depravity are too entrenched for such efforts to work at any meaningful level and too many of the population of those zones will actively work against such efforts.

At best, such civic minded entertainments should await comprehensive law enforcement purges of the ghettos and barrios before being attempted. Otherwise, the street art ends up, as in Mr. Ramos’ sad case, painted in blood and irony.

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Boots On The Ground

Posted in Politics, Society on September 3rd, 2015

I’ve been a lot places across the globe and many of those places haven’t been the sort that one goes to for a vacation. Frankly, many of them have been quite horrific by the gentrified standards of the West. Hence, I see things that others miss – such as the actual state policing in the ghettos.

Boots on the GroundPeriodically and with growing frequency Americans are beset by complaints and rantings from Liberals, Progressives, and Blacktivists about how the police operate in the various and normally crime-ridden Black-controlled municipalities. Such jabberings shouldn’t be given the handout of too much credence but they should be listened to and processed because they’re part of the situation and help fuel the problem.

Yes, there are some behaviors on the part of the police that in the context of normal civilian law enforcement can be described as excessive. Similarly, there are policies in place by law enforcement that in the context of normal civilian policing seem a bit draconian. However, that is all inherently in the context of normal civilian situations and do not believe that context is truly applicable to the ghettos.

I can’t really see anything more than superficial differences and differences of magnitude – for now – between what our soldiers have gone through when they had boots on the ground in places like Fallujah or Lashkar Gah and what the police go through when they have boots on the ground in places like Ferguson and Compton. And the law enforcement policies and the behaviors of the police are similar too to those of soldiers in such benighted places.

True, there’s a happy dearth – so far – of snipers in the ghetto and a total absence – again, so far – of IEDs and roadside bombs in the ghettos. There is, however, other forms and levels of threat to the police and there is the same sort of hate-filled indigenous populations who are uncooperative to the extreme and who view the police as enemy occupiers, enforcing foreign law and control over their lands. And, just like Fallujah or Lashkar Gah, there’s always the credible threat of mass violence lurking just under the surface, ready to hit flashpoint without even a moment’s notice.

Yes, it’s sad to say but boots on the ground are boots on the ground and there’s no intrinsic difference to the situations based solely upon national borders and which uniforms the men and women wear.  The same measures need to be taken; the same mistakes will be made; and the same attitudes will grow and fester.

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