They Deserve It

I admit that I’m suffering from a bit of Schadenfreude Listen or, for my fellow linguists out there: epicaricacy or delectatio morosa. I just can’t help sniggering at the Leftists who voted for Obama in 2012, knowing that his platform was based upon reaving even more wealth from the productive, being horrified and chagrined when they see their now reduced paychecks or read the new tax codes.

<Obama Slut Learns Obamanomics vs. Capitalism
Got Capitalism? Not Quite So Much Anymore, Filth

The Liberals’ and Progressives’ pain is self-induced and it brings me great joy. They deserve it and a great deal more misery for their beliefs, choices, and actions. The only two thing that I wish and that would give me greater joy is if I could increase their pain while exempting Americans from it.

Sadly, while the Liberals and Progressives deserve the pain that they’re not suffering, American don’t but are subject to it as well.

Tags: | | | | | | | | | | | |

That We Have To Ask…

Variations of this question keep coming up in both conversation and in posts, articles, and comments across the internet:

Why is government failure always a justification for more government?

That we have allowed ourselves to be placed in a situation where we are forced to ask this question shows that America has already progressed so far from its true path that there is no solution for America that will not bring pain, misery, and death to many people.

Tags: | | | | | | | | | |

Orwell v. Huxley

George Orwell wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four. Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World. Both were dire, dystopian works that speculated upon a horrid future. The two great authors were, however, wildly divergent in their fears and warnings.

Aldous Huxley v. George Orwell - Divergent Distopian Predictions
George Orwell v. Aldous Huxley – Divergent Distopian Predictions

Both Orwell and Huxley feared a future when we would be a captive culture. Orwell feared captivity by the State but Huxley feared captivity by own venality and pleasure seeking.

Orwell depicted a future society where books were banned and where the State would deprive us of information. Huxley posited a future society where would be no reason to ban a book, because there would be no one who would want to read one, but where so much data would be provided that we would be sunk into egoistic pacifism.

Orwell feared that the State would conceal the truth from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned out by the constant nattering stream of irrelevancies.

Simply put, Orwell feared hate and pain whereas Huxley feared love and pleasure. There is grim sense in both men’s fears; both the “carrot” and the “stick” are used to gain and maintain control.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: | | | | | | | | | | |