It Can Be Like That

The Night Of The 4th of July – It Can Be Like That For Some Of Us

Yes! Especially this year, I want Americans to really celebrate the 4th of July. Yes again! I want us all to raise a joyful and raucous noise unto the Heavens. But maybe remember that some of us don’t “respond well” to those fireworks throughout the night, and we really don’t respond well to those firearm discharges randomly interspersed with them.

Yeah, I know. It’s 2020 and our communities have broken down to the point where most of us don’t know enough about our neighbors to know whether one or more of them might be veterans with PTSD. Still, think about it.

And yes, I’ll likely be spending tonight in a separate bedroom from my wives with my two dogs, one of which has PTSD worse than mine. We’ve got our gear together – weighted blankets, her thunder shirt, and my noise-canceling headphones – and our other dog is a damn fine comfort.

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What Did We Fight For?

What Did We Fight For?
What Did We Fight For?

While anvilicious, crudely and needlessly offensively worded, and a wee bit hysterical in presentation, this has some real truth to it. It truly does seem as if generation after generation of American men have fought, bled, and died for our People only to be forced to watch them degenerate and for many of them to actively turn against every value and bit of culture that was and still is America.

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Requiem Ultra Repris

flanders-poppy

Requiem Ultra Repris
(Click to Enlarge)

It’s past the centennial of the Armistice that ended WW1, but I feel that the dead of that long ago war deserve a reprise of their requiem. And, thanks to the calligraphic skills and efforts of Satwinder Sehmi, this is easy to do. On top of that, his rendering of Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae’s iconic poem as a poppy is brilliant.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place, and in the sky,
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead; short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Indeed, by way of a history lesson, In Flanders Fields is cited as the reason that the poppy is the symbol of remembrance for those who died in service and in war.

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Remembrance

Remembrance

It eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month exactly a century ago that the armistice that ended World War I was signed at Compiègne, France.  Yes, it was exactly 100 years ago that the surviving men of that generation from 32 countries could breathe a sigh of relief and think of going home.

Yet, many millions never went home, save as corpses to be buried or as mere tokens used to keep count.  And, as the years and decades past time in perfect order and “The War To End All Wars” was supplanted by later, more romantic conflicts, even the count became something of import only to some few scholars, those men long gone having passed from remembrance, with the last of their surviving fellows having died on May 5, 2011 at the age of 110.

‘Tis to our shame I think that we spare no time to either review or remember those brave souls nor the war they died in.

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Honor Guard

Honor GuardHonor Guard

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