Requiem Ultra Repris

flanders-poppy

Requiem Ultra Repris
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It’s past the centennial of the Armistice that ended WW1, but I feel that the dead of that long ago war deserve a reprise of their requiem. And, thanks to the calligraphic skills and efforts of Satwinder Sehmi, this is easy to do. On top of that, his rendering of Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae’s iconic poem as a poppy is brilliant.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place, and in the sky,
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead; short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Indeed, by way of a history lesson, In Flanders Fields is cited as the reason that the poppy is the symbol of remembrance for those who died in service and in war.

Related Reading:

In Flanders Fields: The Story of the Poem by John McCrae
All Quiet on the Western Front: A Novel
Marvel's Avengers: Infinity War - The Art of the Movie (Marvel's Avengers: Infinity War - The Art of the Movie (2018))
The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us About Living Fully
The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Prisoner's Dilemma

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Remembrance

Remembrance

It eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month exactly a century ago that the armistice that ended World War I was signed at Compiègne, France.  Yes, it was exactly 100 years ago that the surviving men of that generation from 32 countries could breathe a sigh of relief and think of going home.

Yet, many millions never went home, save as corpses to be buried or as mere tokens used to keep count.  And, as the years and decades past time in perfect order and “The War To End All Wars” was supplanted by later, more romantic conflicts, even the count became something of import only to some few scholars, those men long gone having passed from remembrance, with the last of their surviving fellows having died on May 5, 2011 at the age of 110.

‘Tis to our shame I think that we spare no time to either review or remember those brave souls nor the war they died in.

Related Reading:

Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler
The Forgotten Soldier
The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America’s Unknown Soldier and WWI’s Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home
Drugs and Society
World War I: The Definitive Visual History

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#BelieveAllWomen 1889

#BelieveAllWomen 1889

Yeah, if we’re going to #BelieveAllWomen, we need to rethink how we consider and teach certain unpleasant parts of American people.  After all, those lynchings and the two massacres – Rosewood, FL and Tulsa, OK – that resulted from a Black male raping or trying to rape a White woman have to be taught in that context instead of the sole context of racism.

And yes, those Black males did rape or try to rape those White women. To believe anything else is to spit in the face of every female rape survivor in the world…as any of the vocal sorts of #MeToo will be sure to tell you at great length and with even greater vitriol. Remember, if accusation isn’t enough, you’re just a rape enabler.

So, if we’re going to believe them now and act upon those beliefs, we have to believe them then, and approach the lynching of Black rapists as merely an inappropriately extra-judicial response to these heinous crimes.

Yeah, think about that.

Related Reading:

Cook It in Your Dutch Oven: 150 Foolproof Recipes Tailor-Made for Your Kitchen's Most Versatile Pot
Battles that Changed History
Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are
Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong
Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape

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