Where’s The Love

On Wednesday, February 18, 2015, speaking at a dinner for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker at the 21 Club in Manhattan, Rudy Giuliani spoke the blunt truth about Obama and his feelings towards America.

I do not believe, and I know this is a horrible thing to say, but I do not believe that the president loves America.  He doesn’t love you. And he doesn’t love me. He wasn’t brought up the way you were brought up and I was brought up through love of this country.

— Rudy Giuliani

This, of course, bothered and offended both Obama and the Liberals and Progressives who support and enable him. The White House, mirroring their foreign policy strategy, rapidly responded with a Twitter #hastag, #ObamaLovesAmerica.

The simple truth is that Giuliani’s right in his concerns. Obama doesn’t love America. Nobody who seeks to fundamentally transform something or someone loves it or them; and nobody who consistently denigrates something or someone loves it or them. And this has been the tenor, words, and deeds of Obama’s entire campaign and attempted reign.

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Out And Out

During the last week of January, 2008, America experienced a dramatic streamlining and parring down of the field of candidates for both the Republican and Democrat primary races. Both Republican Rudy Giuliani and Democrat John Edwards retired from their respective races.

Rudy GiulianiRudy Giuliani, who had bet most of his presidential campaign on a decisive Florida win, suffered a disappointing third-place finish in the state’s Republican primary Tuesday night.

Giuliani’s was the frontrunner in the crowded Republican field at first, but his strategy of focusing his attention on Florida while all but ignoring the other states’ Primaries left him unable to adapt to dynamic of the race.

When you run for president you spend a lot of time thinking about the qualities needed to be president Obviously, I thought I was that person. The voters made a different choice.

— Rudy Giuliani

Giuliani had Florida as the gateway to his presidential bid, but found that gateway locked. He is now backing Republican rival and longtime friend John McCain.

John EdwardsJohn Edwards, the former North Carolina senator, was in New Orleans, LA where he started his campaign, when he confirmed that he was abandoning his bid for the US Democratic presidential nomination. This was a shock to his supporters since Edwards vowed last week to stay in the race until Super Tuesday, when almost 50% of the states hold their Primaries.

Edwards finished a strong second in Iowa at the start of the campaign, but was quickly overshadowed and a distant third by Obama and Clinton.

It is time for me to step aside so that history can blaze its path.

— John Edwards

Edwards did not immediately endorse either Obama or Clinton for the Democratic nomination.

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Who Won NV?

The Nevada Primary is over and the press is proclaiming the results to the world at large. According to the media Clinton and Romney won their respective races. But is this actually the case? As with the previous NH primary, that depends on how you look at the primaries and caucuses.

The Democratic results from NV were: Clinton 5,355 (50.7%); Obama 4,773 (45.2%); Edwards 396 (03.8%). This shows that Sen. Clinton edged out Sen. Obama by at 5.5% margin, but did win the popular vote in the NV Primary. This is what the media is reporting about – though, unlike the earlier NH Primary, they’re also reporting on delegate counts as well this time.

Let us though once again look at the practical matter of the allotment of delegates, since its these delegates who will actually nominate the Democratic Partys Presidential Candidate. Its these men and women, plus 852 superdelegates, who will determine which candidate is nominated. Democratic primaries and caucuses award delegates on a proportional basis. Below is the break down of delegates for the 2008 NV Primary:

  • Hillary Clinton won 12 Nevada delegates
  • Barack Obama won 13 Nevada delegates

From the perspective of delegates the 2008 NV Democratic Primary Sen. Barack Obama achieved victory by a margin of 1 NV delegate. This is because many delegates are decided at the district level and Obama won the more heavily populated southern districts in Nevada.

On the Republican side of the 2008 Election race the results were more conclusive: Romney 22,649 (51.1%); Paul 6,087 (13.7%); McCain 5,651 (12.7%); Huckabee 3,616 (8.2%): Thompson 3,521 (7.9%); Giuliani 1,910 (4.3%). This shows Romney as a solid winner of the popular vote in the Republican primary.

As with the Democrats, let us once again look at the practical matter of the allotment of delegates, since its these delegates who will actually nominate the Republican Partys Presidential Candidate.

  • Mitt Romney won 17 Nevada delegates
  • Ron Paul won 4 Nevada delegates
  • John McCain won 4 Nevada delegates
  • Mike Huckabee won 3 Nevada delegates
  • Fred D. Thompson won 2 Nevada delegates
  • Rudolph Giuliani won 1 Nevada delegates

Mitt Romney actually did score a very decisive win the 2008 NV Republican Primary in all practical ways, both by popular support and by delegate allotment.

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Who won NH?

The New Hampshire Primary is over and the press is proclaiming the results to the world at large. According to the media Clinton and McCain won their respective races. But is this actually the case? That depends on how you look at the primaries and caucuses.

The Democratic results from NH were: Clinton 110,550 (39%); Obama: 102,883 (36%); Edwards: 47,803 (17%); Richardson: 12,987 (5%); Kucinich: 3,845 (1%). This shows that Sen. Clinton barely edged out Sen. Obama, but did win the popular vote in the NH Primary. This is what the media is reporting about.

Let us look at the practical matter of the allotment of delegates, since it’s these delegates who will actually nominate the Democratic Party’s Presidential Candidate. It’s these men and women, plus 852 “superdelegates”, who will determine which candidate is nominated. Democratic primaries and caucuses award delegates on a proportional basis. Below is the break down of delegates for the 2008 NH Primary:

  • Hillary Clinton won 9 New Hampshire delegates
  • Barack Obama won 9 New Hampshire delegates
  • John Edwards won 4 New Hampshire delegates

From the perspective of delegates the 2008 NH Democratic Primary was a tie between Sen. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama.

On the Republican side of the 2008 Election race the results were more conclusive: McCain 86,802 (37%); Romney 73,806 (32%); Huckabee 26,035 (11%); Giuliani 20,054 (9%); Paul 17,831 (8%); Thompson 2,808 (1%). This shows McCain as a solid winner of the popular vote in the Republican primary.

Let us once again look at the practical matter of the allotment of delegates, since its these delegates who will actually nominate the Republican Partys Presidential Candidate.

  • John McCain won 7 New Hampshire delegates
  • Mitt Romney won 4 New Hampshire delegates
  • Mike Huckabee won 1 New Hampshire delegate

John McCain actually did win the 2008 NH Republican Primary in all practical ways.

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Happy New Year!

Attention! Let the election frenzy begin in earnest!

Whore you voting for, 2008?
Image courtesy of ZardozZ News & Satire

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