Morrighu’s Foretelling

raven-pentacle-bronzeAt the end of Cath Maighe Tuireadh, also called the Cath Dédenach Maige Tuireadh, Morrighu made this dire prophecy known to all those who had defeated the Formor, lest they grow arrogant and complacent in their victory and in the belief that their victory would bring evil to its knees for all time.

Such is Her way – to always remind all that victory, joy, and peace are fleeting things.

Her words that She sang to the Tuatha Dé Danann, such as they have reached us in these latter days:

I shall not see a world that will be dear to me.
Summer without flowers,
Kine will be without milk,
Women without modesty,
Men without valor,
Captures without a king.

[gap: extent: approx. 6 words]

Woods without mast,
Sea without produce,

[gap: extent: approx. 40 words]

Wrong judgments of old men,
False precedents of brehons,
Every man a betrayer,
Every boy a reaver.
Son will enter his father’s bed,
Father will enter his son’s bed,
Everyone will be his brother’s brother-in-law.

[gap: extent: 8 words]

An evil time!
Son will deceive his father,
Daughter will deceive her mother.

Many scholars think of this as being an eschatological prophecy but I’m not convinced of such. She makes no specific mention of the ending of the world or, even, alludes to it, just the ending of all that worth anything in the world and in the races of Man.

Does it not seem that Morrighu’s foretelling was accurate and that we are in, or fast approaching, the times that She prophesied? This world that I see around is more and more becoming less dear to me and much else that She sang of has come to pass or is coming to pass even now.

Related Reading:

A Basic Guide to Eschatology: Making Sense of the Millennium
The Goddess Guide: Exploring the Attributes and Correspondences of the Divine Feminine
Come Hell or High Water: A Broken Heart Novel (Broken Heart Vampires)
Borealis Island
The Meaning of the Millennium: Four Views

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