The Clinton Campaign

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.)The Clinton Campaign, her real campaign for the 2,025 delegates needed to win as opposed to the scrambling for populist support that we all see on the MSM, is well underway. Sen. Clinton, in another stellar example of her understanding of Realpolitik, has furthered her true campaign for those delegates needs for the Democratic nomination despite Obama’s growing lead in the party’s populist vote during the Democratic Primary race.

According to a LA Times/Bloomberg national poll, Clinton has so far convinced or coerced approximately 50% of the superdelegates to vote for who “they personally support” as opposed to the candidate who won their state’s pledged delegates. Clinton has also managed to gain the support of 52% of the superdelegates for her call to allow delegates from Florida and Michigan to participate in the Democratic National Convention.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the race for the Democratic Nomination is far from over, though the race for the People’s support may well be. It appears that Clinton is willing to concede the popular vote to Obama while she concentrates her efforts and money on directly acquiring the delegates she needs.

Related Reading:

The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream
Crisis of Character: A White House Secret Service Officer Discloses His Firsthand Experience with Hillary, Bill, and How They Operate
Representation and Presidential Primaries: The Democratic Party in the Post-Reform Era (Contributions in Political Science)
Hard Choices: A Memoir
War by Other Means: Geoeconomics and Statecraft

Tags: | | | | | |

4 Responses to “The Clinton Campaign”

  1. Christy Says:

    Sigh.

  2. Steph Says:

    Questions:

    If Hillary Clinton steals the nomination, there will be a huge backlash amongst Democrat voters, the Republicans will exploit it ruthlessly, would she have a chance?

    Also what would be the prospects of Obama running as an independent?

  3. jonolan Says:

    Steph,

    If Clinton steals the nomination there would certainly be a huge backlash and she would most likely loose the general election. I’m unsure if she believes that though and the Democrats have done this before through their unelected superdelegates.

    Obama might have a chance as an independent, but it’s doubtful. The US would be looking at a three way split of voters and I think McCain, who’s centrist and for election reform, would come out on top.

  4. expatbrian Says:

    It is critical that we form reasonable relationships with leaders in the Middle East over the next decades. At the risk of sounding sexist, I just don’t see those leaders, friend or foe, respecting a female US president.

Leave a Reply