Debt-For-Nature

The Nature Conservancy has brokered the largest debt-for-nature swap in history — a deal that will secure long-term, science-based conservation for Costa Rica’s tropical forests:

  • The United States will forgive $12.6 million in debt owed to it by Costa Rica.
  • This move will in turn provide $26 million that will be used to finance forest conservation in Costa Rica over the next 16 years, protecting one of the world’s richest natural treasures for future generations.

This debt swap is unique in that it utilizes scientific analysis to determine the sites towards which the funds will be directed.

— Zdenka Piskulich
Program Director – Conservancy in Costa Rica

For the full story go here.

Related Reading:

Frommer's Costa Rica 2018 (Complete Guides)
Nature Conservancy 2019 Wall Calendar
National Geographic Traveler Costa Rica 5th Edition
Almanac of American Politics 2018
Louisiana Wild: The Protected and Restored Lands of The Nature Conservancy

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9 Responses to “Debt-For-Nature”

  1. Christy Says:

    I don’t even know how to respond.

  2. www.bestfinancialadvisor.info » Debt-For-Nature Says:

    […] jonolan wrote a fantastic post today on “Debt-For-Nature”Here’s ONLY a quick extractThe Nature Conservancy has brokered the largest debt-for-nature swap in history — a deal that will secure long-term, science-based conservation for Costa Rica’s tropical forests:. The United States will forgive $12.6 million in debt … […]

  3. www.bestdebtarticles.info » Debt-For-Nature Says:

    […] jonolan wrote a fantastic post today on “Debt-For-Nature”Here’s ONLY a quick extractThe Nature Conservancy has brokered the largest debt-for-nature swap in history — a deal that will secure long-term, science-based conservation for Costa Rica’s tropical forests:. The United States will forgive $12.6 million in debt … […]

  4. jonolan Says:

    Well, start with is this a good thing or a bad thing?

  5. Christy Says:

    Well, start with is this a good thing or a bad thing?

    Yes, teacher.

    😉

    I’m a bit an extrovert; in other words, I don’t know what I fully think until I’ve processed it out loud…or in this case, processed through writing…my intuition is that this is questionable.

    I’m all for environmental conservation and for taking care of our natural resources, etc., both for ourselves and for future generations. I’m a proponent for being environmentally wise and conscientious, for using wisdom and discernment, for caring about these matters. I believe it’s an ethical issue regarding wise stewardship of what resources we have.

    I also believe it’s up to the one who financed the loan to be able to forgive the debt, but I am not sure I’m comfortable with the underlying principle of debt-swapping in this manner for how it could become a slippery slope – the end to this deal is one I support, but what other kind of debt-swapping deals might not be so agreeable? What else will this type of thinking lead to? Pressure from large nations, exerting their power and authority through being the lenders, to direct funds/debt toward projects/values they deem important? How else could the practice of debt-swapping come into play in the international arena?

  6. jonolan Says:

    Teacher? LOL

    That’s a very interesting point you make. This sort of behavior could be exploited by lending nations. Then again, we already do that amongst other things to “influence” other nations.

  7. Christy Says:

    “Teacher” was used to poke fun at you drawing my thoughts out.
    As for the point, yes, we do it already amongst other things to “influence” other nations – my point is why add one more avenue?
    What is your response to this story? Yea or nea?

  8. jonolan Says:

    My response is a qualified Yea. The program is based on an existent set of legislations that has been tested over 19 years, so it’s had some of the bugs worked out of it. A portion of the money is actually coming from the Nature Conservancy itself; their provide $1 Million of the original $12.6 Million of debt relief. I like it when NGOs get involved in things like this.

  9. Christy Says:

    Good points.

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